Courses

COURSES (2022/2023)

Mariusz Tabaczek, O.P.

STL level

tP 3354 – Creation and Evolution (course offered both in the faculty of theology and philosophy) – STL – 3 ECTS

The course will address and discuss philosophical and theological repercussions of the theory of biological evolution, with a special emphasis on issues related to the classical Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition of metaphysics, ontology, and creation theology. The main themes will include: the possibility of the acceptance of the notion of species transformism on the side of the classical metaphysics and creation theology, the question of whether God creates through evolution, the relation among evolutionary biological and theological anthropogenesis, the question of relevance and plausibility of creationist and intelligent design (ID) movements, the history of the reception of the theory of evolution in the Catholic Church, the contemporary and future theological aspects of the evolution of the human species.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Tabaczek Mariusz. Theistic Evolution: A Contemporary Aristotelian-Thomistic Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (forthcoming).

Austriaco, Nicanor Pier Giorgio, James Brent, Thomas Davenport, and John Baptist Ku. Thomistic Evolution: A Catholic Approach to Understanding Evolution in the Light of Faith. Cluny Media: Tacoma, WA, 2016.

Bowler, Peter J. Evolution: The History of an Idea, 25th Anniversary Edition, Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2009.

Caruana, Louis, ed. Darwin and Catholicism: The Past and Present Dynamics of a Cultural Encounter. T&T Clark, London and New York, 2009.Press, 2017.

Fowler, Thomas B., and Daniel Kuebler. The Evolution Controversy: A Survey of Competing Theories. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2007.

Peters, Ted, and Martin Hewlett. Evolution from Creation to New Creation: Conflict, Conversation, and Convergence. Abingdon Press, Nashville, 2003.

tS 3355 – Creation and Contemporary Science – STL – 4 ECTS

The seminar will address some key questions concerning plausibility of the classical Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical theology of creation in its encounter with natural sciences. It will refer to a broad range of topics, including: creatio ex nihilo and contemporary cosmology, divine action and modern and contemporary scientific notions of causation, God-world relationship in the context of scientifically-informed theology (process theology and panentheism), creation and evolution, theological and biological anthropogenesis, humans as a secondary and instrumental causes, theology of work, and ecology.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Barr, Stephen M. Modern Physics and Ancient Faith. University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Ind, 2003.

Dodds, Michael J. Unlocking Divine Action: Contemporary Science and Thomas Aquinas. Catholic University of America Press, Washington D.C., 2012.

Peters, Ted, and Martin Hewlett. Evolution from Creation to New Creation: Conflict, Conversation, and Convergence. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2003.

Southgate, Christopher (ed.). God, Humanity and the Cosmos – 3rd Edition: A Textbook in Science and Religion. T & T Clark, London and New York, 2011.

Thompson, Christopher J. The Joyful Mystery: Field Notes Toward a Green Thomism. Steubenville, Ohio: Emmaus Road Publishing, 2017.

STB level

TE 3472 – Theology of Creation – STB – 3 ECTS

The course will address and discuss the most important aspects of scriptural exegesis and the dogmatic definition of creation and its crucial aspects such as: creatio ex nihilo, beginning of time and space, Trinity in creation, God-world relationship, divine action, creation and evolution, angels, anthropogenesis, theological anthropology (human condition before and after the original sin), theology of work, and ecology. Based on classical Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy and theology and the teaching of the Magisterium of the Church, enriched with necessary references to contemporary science, the course is thought to help students develop a critical theological reflection and understanding of creation.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Morales, J. Creation Theology. Four Courts Press, Dublin, 2001. [El Misterio de la Creación. Ediciones Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, 1994.]

Paul Haffner, Mystery of Creation. Leominster: Gracewing, 2010.

Zachary Hayes, The Gift of Being: A Theology of Creation. Collegeville, Minn: Michael Glazier, 2001.

Schmaus, M. Dogma. Vol 2: God and Creation. Sheed and Ward, London, 1969.

Ratzinger, J. Im Anfang schuf Gott. Erich Wewel Verlag, 1986. [‘In the Beginning…’ A Catholic Understanding of the story of Creation and the Fall. Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, 1995.]

SE 3471 – Science and Religion – A Historical Approach – STB – 4 ECTS

The seminar will analyze the relation of Christianity to natural sciences throughout the history of the Western culture. The topics discussed will include the following: Antiquity – the origin of science and Christian attitude to Greek and Roman science / Science and religion in Byzantine Empire, Islam, and Latin West / Medieval universities, science, and philosophy of nature / Copernicus, the Galileo affair and its repercussions / Transition to modern science, Christianity and the scientific revolution / Christianity and the Newtonian worldview / Laplace, mechanistic universe, mechanistic conception of life / Earth history and life sciences, Darwin / Modern physics and cosmology and Christian faith. Based on historical analysis the seminar will conclude in discussing models of relating science and religion in contemporary setting.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Edward Grant, Science and Religion I: From Aristotle to Copernicus (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), and Richard G. Olson, Science and Religion II: From Copernicus to Darwin (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004).

Gary B. Ferngren, ed., Science and Religion: A Historical Introduction, second edition (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017).

David C. Lindberg and Ronald L. Numbers, eds., When Science and Christianity Meet (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2008).

W. Mark Richardson and Wesley J. Wildman, Religion & Science: History, Method, Dialogue (New York and London: Routledge, 1996).

Olaf Pedersen, Two Books: Historical Notes on Some Interactions Between Natural Science and Theology (Vatican City: University of Notre Dame Press, 2007).

Thomas Davenport, O.P.

STB level

FE 1006 – Philosophy of Nature I – STB – 3 ECTS

This course aims to answer fundamental questions about nature. What are the common principles and causes under- lying all natural things? It emphasizes the perennial notions of natural philosophy in the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition. We explain the process of change in mobile beings using concepts of act and potency. Next it studies the notions of substance and accidents. Lastly, we examine the notions of form and matter and the substantial synthesis

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

ARISTOTLE, Categories, Physics;

THOMAS AQUINAS, Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, (In VIII libros Physicorum Expositio), translated by R. J. Blackwell, Notre Dame Indiana: Dumb Ox Books, 1999; Idem, The Principles of Nature to Brother Sylvester, (De principiis naturae ad fratem Sylvestrum), translated by R. A. Kocourek in An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nature, St. Paul: North Central Publishing, 1948.

W. A. WALLACE, The Modelling of Nature, Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of Amrica, 1996.

D. MCINERNY, The Philosophy of Nature, Lincoln: The Alquin Press, 2001.

FE 2012 – Philosophy of Nature II – STB – 3 ECTS

This course aims to investigate the Aristotelian-Thomistic notions of natural philosophy and its relationship with experimental sciences. We will focus on a study of the accidents of which we study chiefly quantity and quality but also space, time, action and passion. Lastly, it will examine various alternative philosophies of nature and the relation- ship of all of these views of nature to contemporary science.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

ARISTOTLE, Categories, Physics;

THOMAS AQUINAS, Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, (In VIII libros Physicorum Expositio), translated by R. J. Blackwell, Notre Dame Indiana: Dumb Ox Books, 1999; Idem, The Principles of Nature to Brother Sylvester, (De principiis naturae ad fratem Sylvestrum), translated by R. A. Kocourek in An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nature, St. Paul: North Central Publishing, 1948.

W. A. WALLACE, The Modelling of Nature, Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of Amrica, 1996.

D. MCINERNY, The Philosophy of Nature, Lincoln: The Alquin Press, 2001.

FE 2158 – Sciences and Philosophy – STB – 5 ECTS

This course aims to answer various fundamental questions about contemporary science and philosophy. What is science? How is it related to philosophy and, specifically, the philosophy of nature? We will explain the compatibility and mutual enrichment that should exist between the practice and claims of science and philosophy. Beginning with a historical overview of the development of modern science in the scientific revolution and the parallel developments in philosophy that reacted to it. We will investigate the development of the scientific method, both as expressed and as practiced historically and by contemporary scientists. Finally, we will investigate the ways that the fin- dings of contemporary science challenge certain aspects of the Aristotelian -Thomistic philosophy of nature while reinforcing some of its fundamental principles.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

D. DAHLSTROM, Nature and Scientific Method, Washington D.C. Catholic University of America, 1991.

J. DOUGHERTY, The Nature of Scientific Explanation, Washington D.C.: Catholic University of America, 2013.

D. GILLIES, Philosophy of Science, in the 20th Century: Four Central Themes, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1993.

E. GRANT, The Foundations of Modern Science in the Middle Ages: Their Religious, Institutional, and Intellectual Contexts, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

J. LADYMAN, Understanding the Philosophy of Science, Routledge: 2002.

L.PRINCIPE, The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press: 2011.

FE1019 – Epistemology I – STB – 3 ECTS

This course will cover basics of the Thomistic and Aristotelian theory of knowledge, along with a historical and topical introduction to contemporary problems in epistemology.

These issues will range from post-Gettier accounts of knowledge, the plausibility of foundationalism, externalism/internalism in justification, and the contemporary revival of virtue epistemology.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, translated by the English Dominican Fathers (Benzinger Bros., 1920).

Aristotle, The Basic Works of Aristotle, edited by Richard McKeon (Random House, 2002).

Eleonore Stump, Aquinas (Routledge Press, 2003).

Noah Lemos, An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (Cambridge University Press, 2007).

Ernest Sosa, Epistemology (Princeton University Press, 2019).

Sosa et al., Epistemology: An Anthology, 2nd edition (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008).

FE 2028 – Epistemology II – STB – 3 ECTS

This course complements the Epistemology I course by continuing the discussion of thematic topics in contemporary epistemology, covering: responses to skepticism, and problems particular to testimony, memory, and perception that bear on religious faith. The Aristotelian account of knowledge will be revisited in the light of contemporary virtue epistemology.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

John Greco and John Turri, editors, Virtue Epistemology: Contemporary Readings (MIT Press, 2012).

John Greco, Putting Skeptics in Their Place: The Nature of Skeptical Arguments and Their Role in Philosophical Inquiry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

John Greco, Achieving Knowledge (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Eleonore Stump, Aquinas (Routledge Press, 2003).

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